You Actually Can Eat Gold, But Its Nutritional Value is Dubious

“You can’t eat gold.” The enemies of gold often unleash this little zinger, as if it dismisses the idea of owning gold and indeed the whole gold standard. It is a fact, you cannot eat gold. However, it dismisses nothing.

 

Over-the-top garnish: Gold leaf-laced donut (reportedly costs $100), gold-laced cakes, sushi roll with gold leaf (according to Japanese lore, eating it is supposed to bring luck), gold-cake eater in Dubai. Nutritional value of the gold leaf is zero, but at least it isn’t toxic. So yes, one can eat gold, but it won’t relieve hunger pangs. We would like to point out here that absolutely no-one is trying to eat bank note-laced cakes. [PT]

 

This gives us an idea. Let us tie three facts together. One, you can’t eat gold. Two, gold is in backwardation in Switzerland. And three, speculation is a bet on the price action.

The fact that gold is inedible is supposed (by the enemies of liberty) to be proof positive that a gold standard wouldn’t work. Of course, there’s always the retort: You can’t eat dollars!

That may be emotionally satisfying, but there is a deeper issuer that the anti-gold crowd is missing. Yes, money makes terrible food but, also, food makes terrible money. A car makes a lousy airplane. And a shoe makes an awful TV. Cow poop is putrid as food for people, but it works well as fertilizer for plants. Each thing fits a particular purpose.

Why does food make terrible money? One reason is that it’s perishable. No one — other than a refrigerated warehouse — can make a bid on food beyond his own short-term needs. Without this robust bid, food has limited marketability. That is, it has a wide spread between its bid and offer prices.

Think of it in human terms, or even personal terms. Suppose you strolling along the sidewalk, and you’re hungry. You see a restaurant sign, “Hamburger + fries + drink $10.” You would pay the offer price.

The next restaurant is going out of business, and its sign says, “All inventory must go! 50 hamburgers and 50 pounds of fries for $100!” You would not pay it (unless you were with 49 friends).

Why not? It’s because you can’t possibly carry 49 juicy hamburgers and 49lbs of hot, greasy fries with you as you walk! The bid price is zero or nearly zero. So the bid-ask spread on food is quite wide.

Other than for eating, a hamburger serves no purpose. And you only need to eat a finite amount (unless you are Hafthor Bjornsson). Any burgers beyond that are of no value to you, because they don’t keep very long. You don’t want to stockpile them.

 

For a few hamburgers more, there is always Icelandic strongman Hafthor Bjornsson. [PT]

Photo credit: HBO

 

Economists would say that the marginal utility of hamburgers falls rapidly. The first hamburger satiates your hunger. The second fills you up. The third, well, maybe you were really hungry. The fourth doesn’t do anything for you. It’s useless.

 

Gold is in Backwardation in Switzerland

Now we switch to the second topic. Gold is in backwardation in Switzerland. What does that really mean in human terms? It means you can give up your 100oz gold bar for 3 months, get free use of about CHF 120,000 in the meantime, and in the end get your gold bar back. Plus about CHF 400 in profit.

No one is taking this deal.

Let that sink in. Lots of people have these gold bars. Which they cannot eat, as we have already proven. But they won’t let them go for even three months. The free use of francs and the profit are not attractive. This either means they don’t trust their counterparty to give the gold back, or else that the francs are even more useless than the gold.

Given the high price of the franc — just over $1 — we don’t think that the problem is trust of the counterparty. We would say (and have argued these past few weeks) that the problem is that the Swiss National Bank so flooded the market with francs that they’re now useless. So useless, that people will not decarry gold for a profit. So useless that the bid to borrow them — the bid on the interest rate — is negative.

 

Switzerland: Narrow monetary aggregate M1 since August of 2000. The printing presses have been busy at the SNB. [PT]

 

Speculative Assets Are Useless

Switching topics again, let’s return to something we have often criticized: buying stocks or bitcoin with the hope that the price will rise. Why will it rise? Because the next guy will come along and bid higher. Why will he do that? Because he expects the yet another buyer to bid even more. And so on?

No. There is an end to this cycle. Inevitably, the supply of buyers is depleted. And then what happens is silver in the spring of 2011. Or stocks in 2008. Or tulips in 1637.

Why are there no more buyers? To answer, let’s tie all three of these seemingly isolated facts together. People are buying something, not for any use they can make of it, but solely to front-run that next buyer. He also has no use for it, but merely buys to unload to the next buyer in the chain. They’re all buying something they can’t use, in the hopes of selling it, but no one is asking if anyone has any use for it!

This is why mainstream investors do not buy gold.

We, the gold community, must change our message if we want to reach them. “Gold’s going to $10,000” is not reaching them. At best, mainstream investors think “maybe”. Or else they think, “You have predicted 93 of the past 0 gold spikes to $10,000.”

 

Famous speculative bubbles of the past – the early 18th century South Seas bubble in England (left) and the 17th century Dutch Tulipomania (right)

 

If the only purpose of a thing is to sell it for a higher price, then that thing has no purpose. This could almost be a corollary to Mises’ Regression Theorem. Anyways, gold (unlike francs nowadays, or tulips back in the 17th century) does have a productive purpose.

We spill a lot of words talking about borrowing, lending, interest, debt, extinguishing debt, and servicing debt. We dismiss the definition of money commonly held to be the “medium of exchange” as wrong. We believe that it smuggles in the premise that the government can change economic law merely by enacting legislative law.

It is more important to look at whether a thing can extinguish debt than whether it trades for hamburgers. Why is money not defined in terms of purchasing power, but as the most marketable good? Why is it important to compare the hamburger, whose marginal utility falls to zero, the franc, whose marginal utility is now apparently negative, with gold whose marginal utility is a flat-line or nearly so?

 

Money is Gold, Gold is Money

The hamburger is food because it provided nutrition. Gold is money because it has the narrowest bid-ask spread of any commodity. It has the highest stocks to flows, which shows that its marginal utility declines so little — that after thousands of years of accumulation, we’re still mining more. It is the most marketable commodity, because it has a use to billions of people.

That use is final payment. Even if most people, most of the time, are happy to be creditors, some people some of the time want to be finally paid. Gold, the extinguisher of debt, is final payment. There is never any question about the value of something that has constant or nearly constant marginal utility, because it is final payment demanded by billions of people.

Note: we are not saying payment as in exchange for goods. We are saying payment as in what a creditor demands in satisfaction of the debt. Money is a capital asset. It is not necessarily the hot potato that people receive as wages, and rapidly turn around to pay for goods.

Consider the case that China sells consumer goods to America to obtain dollars, just in time to pay Venezuela for oil. And they, in turn, pay them out in wages, machine parts, and welfare largesse. For this scenario, any old medium of exchange will do. The dollar works fine, and the parties involved would not agree if you denied it.

But money is the thing which is valued specifically to hold, and for the sake of holding it. Unlike the dollar, which can clear trade as a medium of exchange but is not good for saving—gold is good for saving.

Unlike bitcoin, which people speculate will have greater purchasing power. They plan merely to exchange bitcoin for a greater quantity of consumer goods tomorrow. If something is just a token held to trade for consumer goods, it is not a capital asset. It is just deferred consumption, just a deferred consumer good.

Keynes taught that consumption makes the economy go. We suppose that, to Keynes, if an asset goes up and people can sell it to consume more, this is a good thing. Anyway, Keynes was utterly wrong. This is a frivolous error. One cannot consume something that has not been produced. Production must precede consumption.

For hundreds of thousands of years, humans lived at the level of subsistence. They could only produce whatever could be done with their own hands, and at best simple hand tools. They did not accumulate capital.

Capital accumulation and investment make the economy go. Keynes misses this fact, along with all who love the (seemingly) endless rise in asset prices driven by the (pathologically) falling interest rate. They think that it’s possible to consume without producing, by just betting on rising prices. They don’t know that they are just eating the seed corn.

So long as one man has a surplus of hamburgers and another has a surplus of gasoline, they will want to trade. So long as men want to trade, there will be some kind of medium of exchange. But that medium of exchange is not necessarily money. That medium can convey value, but not store nor measure it.

JP Morgan said it best, in his testimony before Congress.

“Money is gold, and nothing else.”

 

He be our witness: Gold bug of yore, James Pierce-eye Morgan the Grim, in his own terrifying splendor. [PT]

 

Precious Metals Supply and Demand

Not Like 2008

The price of gold went up $14 last week, but the price of silver fell 3 cents. The fundamentals are firming up a bit, more in gold than in silver, while the S&P index has fallen 125 points — over 4% — in a week. So far, this seems to be playing out as we said it could.

The stock market has been on a steady escalator trip upwards since Obama took office. By contrast, the prices of the metals have been down and sideways since 2011.

 

Moving in opposite directions: SPX vs. gold [PT]

 

So if there is a rising crisis due to rising rates, falling currencies, debtor defaults and all the rest of the syndrome, then the precious metals would not necessarily behave as they did in 2008. Recall that by the crisis, the metals had been in a bull market for seven years.

Now they have been in a bear market for that same length of time.

 

Fundamental Developments

We will look at the supply and demand fundamentals of both metals. But, first, here is the chart of the prices of gold and silver.

 

Gold and silver priced in USD

 

Next, this is a graph of the gold price measured in silver, otherwise known as the gold to silver ratio (see here for an explanation of bid and offer prices for the ratio). It rose this week.

 

Gold-silver ratio – moving higher again

 

Here is the gold graph showing gold basis, co-basis and the price of the dollar in terms of gold price.

 

Gold basis, co-basis and the USD priced in milligrams of gold

 

The price of the dollar dropped a bit, again this week. We don’t say this merely to be pedantic. If one thinks that gold goes up and down, and that the very measure of altitude is the dollar, then one cannot understand what is really going on. One should see a week like this one as a drop in the value of the dollar, not a rise in gold.

With that drop in the dollar, we have an increase in the scarcity of gold. One commentator on Twitter this week wondered why they didn’t issue more shares of GLD as the price rose. The answer is that the price rise was not centered in GLD, but in metal.

The Monetary Metals Gold Fundamental Price turned around, rising from $1,272 to $1,299.

Now let’s look at silver.

 

Silver basis, co-basis and the USD priced in grams of silver

 

In silver, of course the metal became scarcer. Of course, because its price fell. That is, we are not looking for where the buying was focused. We are looking for where the selling was focused. As is the typical pattern, speculators were selling futures.

The Monetary Metals Silver Fundamental Price also rose a few pennies, from $15.27 to $15.31.

 

Charts and data by: acting-man, SNB, Larry Neal, EWI, StockCharts, Monetary Metals

 

Chart and image captions by PT

 

Dr. Keith Weiner is the president of the Gold Standard Institute USA, and CEO of Monetary Metals. Keith is a leading authority in the areas of gold, money, and credit and has made important contributions to the development of trading techniques founded upon the analysis of bid-ask spreads. Keith is a sought after speaker and regularly writes on economics. He is an Objectivist, and has his PhD from the New Austrian School of Economics. He lives with his wife near Phoenix, Arizona.

 

 

 

Emigrate While You Can... Learn More

 


 

 
 

Dear Readers!

You may have noticed that our so-called “semiannual” funding drive, which started sometime in the summer if memory serves, has seamlessly segued into the winter. In fact, the year is almost over! We assure you this is not merely evidence of our chutzpa; rather, it is indicative of the fact that ad income still needs to be supplemented in order to support upkeep of the site. Naturally, the traditional benefits that can be spontaneously triggered by donations to this site remain operative regardless of the season - ranging from a boost to general well-being/happiness (inter alia featuring improved sleep & appetite), children including you in their songs, up to the likely allotment of privileges in the afterlife, etc., etc., but the Christmas season is probably an especially propitious time to cross our palms with silver. A special thank you to all readers who have already chipped in, your generosity is greatly appreciated. Regardless of that, we are honored by everybody's readership and hope we have managed to add a little value to your life.

   

Bitcoin address: 12vB2LeWQNjWh59tyfWw23ySqJ9kTfJifA

   
 

2 Responses to “You Can’t Eat Gold – Precious Metals Supply and Demand”

  • David Jones:

    Keith, thank you for this insightful look into gold.

    “With that drop in the dollar, we have an increase in the scarcity of gold. One commentator on Twitter this week wondered why they didn’t issue more shares of GLD as the price rose. The answer is that the price rise was not centered in GLD, but in metal.”

    I’ve spent quite a bit of time doing my due diligence into GLD. Would you happen to know why there is a clause in the GLD prospectus that states GLD has no right to audit subcustodial gold holdings? The GLD managing organizations sure went out of their way to create this glaring audit loophole. What is the purpose of this loophole? Additionally, the GLD organizations promise that this fund is 100% backed by actual physical gold but yet they staunchly deny retail investors the right to any of their listed physical gold. I’ve also discovered a number of other issues along the way:

    “CNBC’s Bob Pisani also made a highly publicized visit to GLD’s gold vault in a segment called Gold Rush: The Mother Lode. GLD’s administration organized this visit to show that GLD’s gold actually exists. However, the gold bar held up by Mr. Pisani showed a serial number of ZJ6752 which did not show up on the latest bar list during that time. It was later found that this “GLD” bar actually belonged to ETF Securities.”

    “Did anyone try calling the GLD hotline at (866) 320 4053 in search of numerical details on GLD’s insurance? The prospectus vaguely states “The Custodian maintains insurance with regard to its business on such terms and conditions as it considers appropriate which does not cover the full amount of gold held in custody.” When I asked about how much of the gold was insured, the representative proceeded to act as if he didn’t know and said they were just the “marketing agent” for GLD. What kind of marketing agent would not know such basic information about a product they are marketing? It seems like they are deliberately hiding information from investors.”

    • RedQueenRace:

      Keep trying, spammer. This is at least the third post of this nature on this site alone that I have seen. But you folks are having no effect on GLD at all. It’s comical to watch.

      If you clowns are doing this because you think paper is “sapping” physical gold demand I have news for you: You are clueless. The people are using paper because they are trading and don’t want the hassle of dealing with physical. The same goes for the futures market and all the idiotic arguments against it.

Your comment:

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Most read in the last 20 days:

  • The Hollow Promise of a Statist Economy
      Brainwashed by Academe Not a day goes by that doesn’t supply a new specimen of inane disclarity.  Muddy ideas are dredged up from tainted minds like lumps of odorous pond muck.  We do our part to clean up the mess, whether we want to or not.   No longer in demand: famous Enlightenment philosopher John Locke (1632–1704), who is widely considered the “Father of Liberalism” (classical liberalism, that is). [PT]   These days, individuals, who like John...
  • The Great Debasement - Precious Metals Supply and Demand
      Fiat Money Woes Monday was Labor Day holiday in the US. The facts are that the euro lost another 1.4%, the pound another 1.1%, and the yuan another 0.9% last week.   Assorted foreign fiat confetti against the US dollar – we have added the Argentine peso as well, as it demonstrates what can happen when things really get out of hand. [PT]   So, naturally, what is getting play is a story that Bank of England governor Mark Carney said the dollar’s influence...
  • Hong Kong - Never the Same Again
      Freedom Rock Hong Kong ranks among the freest societies in the world. Not only economically, but socially it is a very liberal place. It was marinated in British ways until 1997, much longer than Singapore and other colonies. Then China took it over as a special administered region, which according to the agreement with the UK meant that it was only nominally to be under Chinese control for the next 50 years. It was possibly the only colony in which a vast majority of citizens did not...
  • Suffering the Profanity of Plentiful Cheap Money
      A Case of Highway Robbery What if the savings in your bank account lost 55 percent of its value over the last 12 months?  Would you be somewhat peeved?  Would you transfer some of your savings to another currency?   USD-ARS, weekly. For several years the Argentine Peso has followed a certain pattern: it declines mildly, but steadily, with little volatility for long time periods, and then spikes in crash waves whenever a crisis situation comes to a head. In early 2011, it...
  • Don’t Be Another Wall Street Chump
      The Future and the Past Securities and Exchange Commission Rule 156 requires financial institutions to advise investors to not be idiots. Hence, the disclosure pages of nearly every financial instrument in the U.S. are embedded with the following admission or variant thereof:   “Past Performance Is Not Indicative of Future Results”   “Buy and hold”... “The market goes always up”... “No-one can time the market”... “Buy the dip” “With what? You...
  • A Wild Week - Precious Metals Supply and Demand
      Paying a Premium for a Lack of Default Risk The price action got pretty intense last week! The prices of the metals were up Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. But Thursday and Friday, there was a sharp reversal and the silver price ended the week below its close of the previous week.   The net speculative position in gold futures has become very large recently – the market was more than ripe for a shake-out. [PT]   Silver made a round trip down from $18.35 to...
  • Will the Nikkei Win the Next Olympic Games?
      Listless Nikkei On 24 July 2020 the Olympic Summer Games will begin in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. Olympic Games and Soccer World Cups are among the largest sporting events in the world.  Do you perhaps also think that these events may affect the performance of local stock markets?   Olympic Summer Games 2020 – official logo (left), and a fan-made logo (right) by designer Daren Newman [PT]   Let us examine whether and in what way such major sporting events impact...
  • The Weird Obsessions of Central Bankers, Part 3
      Inflation and “Price Stability” We still remember when sometime in the mid 1980s, the German Bundesbank proudly pointed to the fact that Germany's y/y consumer price inflation rate had declined to zero. It was considered a “mission accomplished” moment. No-one mentioned that economic nirvana would remain out of sight unless price inflation was pushed to 2% per year.   CPI, annual rate of change. During the “stagflation” period of the 1970s, Congress enacted the...
  • The Weird Obsessions of Central Bankers, Part 1
      How to Hang on to Greenland Jim Bianco, head of the eponymous research firm, handily won the internet last Thursday with the following tweet:     Jim Bianco has an excellent idea as to how Denmark might after all be able to hang on to Greenland, a territory coveted by His Eminence, POTUS GEESG Donald Trump (GEESG= God Emperor & Exceedingly Stable Genius). Evidently the mad Danes running the central bank of this Northern European socialist paradise were...
  • The Weird Obsessions of Central Bankers, Part 2
      The Negative Interest Rates Abomination Our readers are probably aware that assorted central bankers and the economic advisors orbiting them occasionally mention the “natural interest rate” (a.k.a. “originary interest rate”) in speeches and papers. It is generally assumed that it has declined, which is to say, time preferences are assumed to have decreased.   This is actually an understatement...   Although interest is generally associated with money, the...
  • Why Are People Now Selling Their Silver? Precious Metals Supply and Demand
      Big Moves in Silver Last week, the prices of the metals fell further, with gold -$18 and silver -$0.73. On May 28, the price of silver hit its nadir, of $14.30. From the last three days of May through Sep 4, the price rose to $19.65. This was a gain of $5.35, or +37%. Congratulations to everyone who bought silver on May 28 and who sold it on September 4.   The recent move in silver [PT]   To those who believe gold and silver are money (as we do) the rising price...

Support Acting Man

Austrian Theory and Investment

j9TJzzN

The Review Insider

Archive

Dog Blow

THE GOLD CARTEL: Government Intervention on Gold, the Mega Bubble in Paper and What This Means for Your Future

Realtime Charts

 

Gold in USD:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

Gold in EUR:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

Silver in USD:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

Platinum in USD:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

USD - Index:

[Most Recent USD from www.kitco.com]

 

Mish Talk

 
Buy Silver Now!
 
Buy Gold Now!