Pro-Growth Occurrences

An endearing quality of a late stage bull market is that it expands the universe of what’s possible.  Somehow, rising stock prices make the impossible, possible.  They also push the limits of the normal into the paranormal.

 

This happens almost every time Bigfoot is in front of a camera. [PT]

Cartoon by Gary Larson

 

Last week, for instance, there was a Bigfoot sighting near Avocado Lake in Fresno County, California.  But it wasn’t just one Bigfoot.  According to a local farmer, there was a family of five or six Bigfoot running across his ranch in the middle of the night.  Paranormal expert Jeffery Gonzalez offered the following Bigfoot sighting anecdote:

 

“One of them, which was extremely tall, had a pig over its shoulder.  And the five scattered and the one with the pig was running so fast it didn’t see an irrigation pipe and it tripped, with the pig flying over.”

 

What to make of it? Bigfoot sightings, no doubt, are pro-growth.  They’re bullish for stock prices.  So, too, are warnings from North Korea that nuclear war “may break out at any moment.”

How do we know these two unrelated events are bullish?  Because if you plot the S&P 500’s price movement since their occurrences, you’ll find that the market is up.  There is a direct – albeit false – correlation.

And these days a correlation of any kind is what matters.  No one cares that correlation does not imply causation.  Such a pesky detail doesn’t matter to Phillips Curve adherents.  Why should it matter for anything else?

Indeed, there are plenty of things that used to matter, which no longer matter.  For example, stock valuations don’t matter.  Profits don’t matter.  Most of all, deficits don’t matter.

 

Occasionally, Bigfoot will allow people to make photographs of him, but there are certain conditions: for instance, the camera used for taking the picture has to be the absolutely crappiest camera in use on the entire planet at that moment. Leave your Hasselblad at home – it’s not going to work. [PT]

 

The Greatest Fools of All

The point is an eight-year run of rising stock market indexes has suspended, if not eradicated, the natural laws of the universe.  What was once considered rash or ridiculous is now shrewd and savvy.  Conversely, tried and true investment principles, including evaluating business fundamentals, are for losers who lack imagination.

The proof of the pudding is in the eating, goes the maxim.  Certainly, investors are lapping up this market like boysenberry funnel cakes at the county fair.  They can’t get enough of it.

They will stand in line in the hot sun for hours to buy Amazon stock at $1,000 per share at a price-to-earnings ratio above 250.  Because in this late stage bull market, growth and revenue are where it’s at.  That’s what today’s savvy market participants want.  They don’t care if, like farming, the attainment of growth and revenue comes at a loss.

To be fair, Amazon no longer operates at a loss.  Last year they booked $2.4 billion in net income.  Unfortunately, they had to bring in $136 billion in revenue – a net profit margin of 1.7 percent – to do so.  While some profit is better than no profit, in our book, the Amazon folks sure did a lot of running around with not much money left over to show for it.

So, what is it that attracts investors to Amazon?  Do they want to become part owners of a profit generating machine with an abundance of after tax income?  Is there a dividend they get paid for placing their money at risk?

To the contrary, Amazon investors receive no tangible income stream.  Instead, they make a bet that there will be a greater fool standing by to pay a premium when they are ready to sell their shares.  In fact, those who bought at $1,000 per share may find that there are no greater fools left – yesterday’s close was $986.  Thus, if there are no greater fools left, by default, they are the greatest fools of all.

 

AMZN, weekly. We think investors are rewarding Amazon because they perceive it to have won the internet retail race, which is probably a correct assessment. Admittedly it is indeed a great service that is really looking after its customers – even though it often does not have the best offers. That said, its margins are razor-thin and it has never shown any propensity to generate noteworthy earnings. The question investors must ask themselves is what is priced in at this stage and what isn’t. We think the “parabolic phase” of the advance is mainly a result of the vast money supply expansion of recent years. The insert shows a close-up of the most recent weekly candles. We want to direct your attention to the week in which the $1,083 peak was attained intra-week. The long upper shadow of this weekly candle is ominous, particularly as it has still not been negated 12 weeks later. It is therefore definitely conceivable that the greatest fool has already been on the scene, and that whoever paid the aforementioned peak price is holding the bag, as the saying goes. [PT] – click to enlarge.

 

Tales from a Late Stage Bull Market

Obviously, Amazon stock has been a fantastic speculation over the last 20 years.  Its stock price has risen from a split-adjusted $1.50 at its 1997 initial public offering to over $1,000.  That’s over a 60,000 percent increase.  Each dollar invested has transformed to $600.

But at this late stage in the bull market it is unlikely that Amazon will continue its trajectory into the upper stratosphere for much longer.  The fact is, Amazon’s profitability will never rise to its present market capitalization.  Those who bought shares of Amazon at $1,000 may not have the opportunity to sell at that price again until the year 2040, if ever.

From a broader perspective, the stock market is currently overvalued on 18 of 20 valuation metrics.  Naturally, timing the stock market’s ultimate crest is for wizards and palm readers.  However, anyone with half an inkling about anything knows the market’s much closer to its next top than its last bottom.

 

Via John Hussman: two stock market valuation metrics that show how overvalued the market is: margin-adjusted CAPE (Shiller P/E) and the median price-to-revenues ratio of SPX component stocks. In his latest market comment, John Hussman explains why the argument that low interest rates justify these extreme valuations is actually erroneous – we think his reasoning is well worth considering. We would also note that much depends on the state of the economy’s pool of real funding – while it is not measurable, it is definitely going to affect asset prices and the economy if it ever begins to stagnate or shrink. [PT] – click to enlarge.

 

Hence, if you’re determined to buy stocks, you should take a moment to understand just what it is you’re buying.  Are you buying growth and revenue that’s pumped up by massive levels of debt?  Or are you buying a business that cranks out tangible after tax profits that are distributed to shareholders?

Knowing the difference is critically important.  Sure, high growth and revenue companies – pumped up by massive monetary intervention – were the hot lottery tickets over the last few years.  But when the dust settles following the next crash, and when Bigfoot sightings no longer serve as bullish indicators, boring old profitable businesses will be the prized holdings for investors.  Anything less will be detested.

 

Just keep your ears peeled – when you no longer hear the crickets, then it has become too quiet Kemosabe, as Tonto would say.

Cartoon by Gary Larson

 

Charts by: StockCharts, John Hussman

 

Chart and image captions by PT

 

MN Gordon is President and Founder of Direct Expressions LLC, an independent publishing company. He is the Editorial Director and Publisher of the Economic Prism – an E-Newsletter that tries to bring clarity to the muddy waters of economic policy and discusses interesting investment opportunities.

 

 

 

Emigrate While You Can... Learn More

 


 

 
 

Dear Readers!

You may have noticed that our so-called “semiannual” funding drive, which started sometime in the summer if memory serves, has seamlessly segued into the winter. In fact, the year is almost over! We assure you this is not merely evidence of our chutzpa; rather, it is indicative of the fact that ad income still needs to be supplemented in order to support upkeep of the site. Naturally, the traditional benefits that can be spontaneously triggered by donations to this site remain operative regardless of the season - ranging from a boost to general well-being/happiness (inter alia featuring improved sleep & appetite), children including you in their songs, up to the likely allotment of privileges in the afterlife, etc., etc., but the Christmas season is probably an especially propitious time to cross our palms with silver. A special thank you to all readers who have already chipped in, your generosity is greatly appreciated. Regardless of that, we are honored by everybody's readership and hope we have managed to add a little value to your life.

   

Bitcoin address: 12vB2LeWQNjWh59tyfWw23ySqJ9kTfJifA

   
 

2 Responses to “Tales From a Late Stage Bull Market”

  • Hans:

    As long as earnings rise, little else matters – in the long run.

  • rossmorguy:

    Pater, you wrote that Amazon “is indeed a great service that is really looking after its customer,” which may by now be at best only half true. Many customers are finding that they are nowadays receiving shoddy products, particularly if they are ordering high quality branded items from third party vendors, who are not being adequately vetted by Amazon. In other words, counterfeiting is becoming increasingly rampant, apparently with Amazon’s consent if not downright encouragement. So far this has not showed up in their top line, but someday soon it just might, and then all hell will break loose. If you would like an example, look into the thousands of counterfeit safety sunglasses that were sold so that trusting souls could view the total eclipse of the sun this past August. This is one extreme and pernicious example, but the problem is growing and may already be out of hand.

Your comment:

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Most read in the last 20 days:

  • A Golden Renaissance – Precious Metals Supply & Demand
      Battles for Civilization A major theme of my work — and raison d’etre of Monetary Metals — is fighting to prevent collapse. Civilization is under assault on all fronts.   Battling the barbarians at the gate... [PT]   There is the freedom of speech battle, with the forces of darkness advancing all over. For example, in Pakistan, there are killings of journalists. Saudi Arabia apparently had journalist Khashoggi killed. New Zealand now can force travelers to...
  • The Federal Punch Bowl Removal Agency
      US Money Supply and Credit Growth Continue to Slow Down Not to belabor the obvious too much, but in light of the recent sharp rebound, the stock market “panic window” is almost certainly closed for this year.* It was interesting that an admission by Mr. Powell that the central planners have not the foggiest idea about the future which their policy is aiming to influence was taken as an “excuse” to drive up stock prices. Powell's speech was regarded as dovish. If it actually was,...
  • The Non-Expiring Hedge - Precious Metals Supply and Demand
      The “Risk Asset” Dip Not Worth Buying is on its Way The prices of the metals rose, gold by +$11 and silver by +$0.25. The question on everyone’s mind (including ours) is: what will cause a change in the gold price trend, or what will make gold go up in a large and durable way? And that leads to another way of looking at this question.   Here is a very good technical reason to adopt a constructive attitude toward gold despite the fact that its nominal price in USD terms...
  • A Global Dearth of Liquidity
      Worldwide Liquidity Drought - Money Supply Growth Slows Everywhere This is a brief update on money supply growth trends in the most important currency areas outside the US (namely the euro area, Japan and China)  as announced in in our recent update on US money supply growth (see “Federal Punch Bowl Removal Agency” for the details).   Nobody likes a drought. This collage illustrates why.   The liquidity drought is not confined to the US – it is fair to...
  • The Zealous Pursuit of State Sponsored Wealth Destruction
      How to Blow $9 Billion The life cycle of capital follows a wide-ranging succession. It is imagined, produced, consumed, and destroyed. How exactly this all takes place involves varying and infinite undulations.   The Stroh Brewery in Detroit. The company provided an example of how wealth that has been accumulated over generations can be completely destroyed due to just a handful of really bad decisions. [PT]   One generation may produce wealth, while the...
  • Debt, Death, and the US Empire
      Yosemite Sam Gets Worried About Federal Debt In a talk which garnered little attention, one of the Deep State’s prime operatives, National Security Advisor John Bolton, cautioned of the enormous and escalating US debt.   Deep State operative John Bolton, a.k.a. Yosemite Sam [PT] Photo credit: Mark Wilson / Getty Images   Speaking before the Alexander Hamilton Society, Bolton warned that current US debt levels and public obligations posed an “economic...
  • The Bien Pensants Agree: The World Doesn’t Need Gold – Precious Metals Supply and Demand
      The Last Thing to be Left Standing – Alas, Not Yet  The price of gold was about unchanged this week, whereas that of silver fell another nine cents. All Serious Right Thinking people agree that the world does not need gold. Indeed our monetary system produces Great Moderations that are totally unlike the incredible volatility of the gold standard era. They wish they could kill all memory of gold as money.   Ben Bernanke, the inventor of the “Great Moderation” fairy tale,...
  • How To Give Thanks Like Socrates
      Political Correctness Indoctrination [ed note: we are posting this belatedly as it was originally supposed to be published on Thanksgiving Day. Unfortunately your editor was out of commission... but MN Gordon's article is still worth reading. - PT]  Ordinary ideals of Americana range as far and wide as the North American continent.  The valued conviction of one American vastly differs from that of another.  For example, someone from the Mid-Atlantic may have little connection...
  • Trump or Seasonality: Which One is Going to Prevail in the Dollar's Late Year Surge?
      A Plethora of Headaches We hope the recent market turmoil is not giving our readers too much of a headache. As you are no doubt aware, the events of the last few weeks have made maneuvering around global markets rather difficult.   A less than happy NYSE floor trader [PT] Photo crdit: Brendan McDermit   The US faces uncertain economic times, as Trump and Xi Jinping remain locked in a bitter trade dispute that is likely to go on for some time, creating uncertainty...
  • Paper Lanterns
      Mud Volcanoes There are numerous explanations for just what in the heck is going on with the economy.  Some are good.  Many are bad.  Today we’ll do our part to bring clarity to disorder...   Two data series it is worth paying attention to at the moment: the unemployment rate (U3) and initial claims. As the chart at the top shows, when the former makes a low it is time to worry about the economy. Low points in the U3 UE rate slightly lead the beginning of recessions....

Support Acting Man

Item Guides

Austrian Theory and Investment

j9TJzzN

The Review Insider

Archive

Dog Blow

350x200

THE GOLD CARTEL: Government Intervention on Gold, the Mega Bubble in Paper and What This Means for Your Future

Realtime Charts

 

Gold in USD:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

Gold in EUR:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

Silver in USD:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

Platinum in USD:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

USD - Index:

[Most Recent USD from www.kitco.com]

 

Mish Talk

 
Buy Silver Now!
 
Buy Gold Now!