If You Can’t Beat Them, Outlaw Them …

We have previously reported on the French obsession with stifling competition to the vast detriment of the consumer, so as to protect established businesses with all sorts of legal restrictions. A prime example of this nonsense is that the French have made free shipping by Amazon illegal in France (as discussed by Mish here). Mercantilism has never died in France, and today it is imposed under the guise of the so-called “cultural exception”, which ostensibly aims to “protect French culture” (see “France Threatens Trade Talks Over Cultural Exception” for details on this). There is much about French culture that is indeed admirable and admired the world over – and it obviously doesn’t require bureaucratic “protection”. That is a turn-off at best.

So we are not surprised to learn that the French government is in ever greater hysterics over the success of US based internet companies. “There ought to be a law”, and very likely there will be a law – French consumers and their preferences be damned. A recent article at Yahoo reports on “One country’s desperate battle to erase Google, Netflix and Uber from existence”:

 

“The French don’t play. Ever since Minitel bit dust, the continental power has been hopping mad about American domination of Internet services. And over the past weeks, attacks on U.S. giants have escalated from Paris to Lille.

Netflix is right now in the middle of an ambitious European expansion drive that started in Scandinavia and is fanning out south. Sure enough, France’s Association for the Protection of Consumers and Users has now sued Netflix for “malicious and illegal clauses.” These include changing the terms of contract without informing consumers, not offering information of guaranteed minimum quality and writing contract clauses in English.

No doubt this is only the opening salvo against Netflix in France, which guards its cultural heritage jealously. The U.S. streaming service tried to preempt Gallic criticism by financing a political drama series called Marseilles, but this appears to have been ineffective.

Uber’s French launch has been, if anything, more controversial than the Netflix debut. Infuriated taxi drivers in Lille have attacked a student for trying to enter an Uber car, first attempting to block her from opening the car door, then allegedly throwing a bottle at her head. The Uber POP service is about 20% cheaper than French taxis.

The French legal attacks on Google are too numerous to list here but the latest one actually has an entirely novel twist. France is now threatening Google with a hefty, €1,000 penalty for every defamatory link the company fails to remove from its global network of Google subsidiaries.

Google agreed earlier this year in Europe to remove links to articles that may be considered “outdated and inflammatory” — in other words, Europeans can demand removal of old search results that they consider embarrassing. But the new penalty scheme essentially holds the French subsidiary of Google responsible for the actions of its sister and parent entities. This in turn means that the French are attempting to make their legislative decisions global.

What to make of all these recent moves against some of America’s most successful corporations? They seem to indicate that France has no intention of trying to emulate the American model and foster growth of its own IT industry — instead, the country seems to be sliding towards perpetual guerrilla war against foreign tech powers. It is hard to overemphasize just how futile this bitter battle against the future looks to foreign observers.”

 

(emphasis added)

We should perhaps point out here that to some extent, this is blow-back. The US government was the first entity trying to enact domestic laws with a global reach, such as the FATCA act, which will cost an order of magnitude more to enforce than it can possibly ever create in additional tax revenue. However, this was never the aim of implementing such laws in the first place. The real aim is total control over the citizenry.

So now the French are also trying to imbue their laws with a global reach. Obviously, the internet is a global phenomenon, and it will be very difficult to keep French citizens from doing things that are “prohibited”, such as finding out about past transgression that are “embarrassing” to members of the neo-feudal ruling elite and can now be erased – interestingly under the guise of “protecting privacy” (which is utterly ridiculous considering the by now well-known ubiquitous surveillance activities of the so-called “security apparatus”).

 

netflix-to-conquer-france-with-french-political-drama-marseilleNetflix tried to win over the French bureaucrats with an original series – apparently to no avail

(Screenshot via bidnessetc.com)

 

As we already noted in connection with the EU’s attempt to “break up Google”, these examples of protectionism are especially farcical, as there is not even anything to protect. Where is the European Google, or the European Netflix? No such company exists! Such globally successful companies in fact can hardly be expected to come into existence in Europe, precisely because of the Mercantilistic attitude of many EU member countries, and their onerous regulation and taxation regimes.

If France wanted to see viable European competition for US internet companies arise, it would need to adopt free market principles. As the writer of the article quoted above points out, it looks instead more and more like all they want is waging a “perpetual guerrilla war against foreign tech powers in a futile and bitter battle against the future.”

 

uber protests-paris1French taxi drivers in protest against “unfair competition”. Maybe they should try improving their customer service instead?

(Photo credit: AFP / ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT)

 

 

 

Emigrate While You Can... Learn More

 


 

 
 

Dear Readers!

You may have noticed that our so-called “semiannual” funding drive, which started sometime in the summer if memory serves, has seamlessly segued into the winter. In fact, the year is almost over! We assure you this is not merely evidence of our chutzpa; rather, it is indicative of the fact that ad income still needs to be supplemented in order to support upkeep of the site. Naturally, the traditional benefits that can be spontaneously triggered by donations to this site remain operative regardless of the season - ranging from a boost to general well-being/happiness (inter alia featuring improved sleep & appetite), children including you in their songs, up to the likely allotment of privileges in the afterlife, etc., etc., but the Christmas season is probably an especially propitious time to cross our palms with silver. A special thank you to all readers who have already chipped in, your generosity is greatly appreciated. Regardless of that, we are honored by everybody's readership and hope we have managed to add a little value to your life.

   

Bitcoin address: 12vB2LeWQNjWh59tyfWw23ySqJ9kTfJifA

   
 

2 Responses to “France Desperate to “Erase US Internet Companies From Existence””

  • John Galt III:

    ……”to protect French Culture”…..

    France has a culture?

    The culture is socialism, unlimited Muslim immigration, PC (political cowardice) politicians: Sarkozy, Le Pen and Hollande, the latter who said, “I hate the rich” and who has 3 houses on the French Riviera. I can’t stand the French. They are a typical European country populated by eloi. They will wake up or they will die. I hope they wake up.

  • No6:

    France actually would have done better under German rule, ‘liberation’ has come at a terrible price!

Your comment:

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Most read in the last 20 days:

  • The Impulses of Lunar Fed Policy Under Repo Madness
      Trepidation Nation This week, while you were busy working, Jamie Dimon, CEO of JP Morgan Chase, took time out from rubbing elbows with fellow movers and shakers at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, to share his trepidations:   “The only thing I have trepidation about is negative interest rates, QE, and the diversion between stock prices and bond prices and yield and stuff like that...  I think it’s very hard for central banks to forever make up for bad...
  • Opportunities in the Gold Exploration Sector
      An Unloved Sector We rarely discuss individual stocks in these pages, but we make an exception now and then when we spot exceptional opportunities. This time the reason is actually more mundane: the vast majority of gold exploration stocks failed to benefit from the rally in precious metals prices last year. As a result many of them came under even greater pressure in the tax loss selling season at the end of the year. We made a list of such stocks late last year – a download link to the...
  • The Triumph of Madness
      Historic Misjudgments in Hindsight Viewing the past through the lens of history is unfair to the participants.  Missteps are too obvious.  Failures are too abundant.  Vanities are too absurd.  The benefit of hindsight often renders the participants mere imbeciles on parade.   The moment Custer realized things were not going exactly as planned. [PT]   Was George Armstrong Custer really just an arrogant Lieutenant Colonel who led his men to massacre at Little...
  • The Strongest Seasonal Advance in Precious Metals Stocks Begins Now
      Bonanza Season In the 18 December 2019 issue of Seasonal Insights I discussed the strong seasonal advance in precious metals around the turn of the year. In silver it begins in mid December and continues until the end of February. A roughly similar pattern can be observed in platinum and palladium, while seasonal buoyancy is at least to some degree evident in gold as well.   Long-term silver and platinum seasonal charts from the late 2019 issue of Seasonal Insights : the...
  • US Stock Market  - Sentiment and Positioning
      Market Drivers The recent outbreak of a dangerous respiratory illness caused by a new Corona virus in China was widely blamed for the stock market sell-off on Monday last week. It is undoubtedly true that the epidemic has the potential to severely disrupt economic activity, although it is too early to come to a definitive conclusion about that. Be that as it may, the event actually serves as an excellent example illustrating that the news of the day are incidental to market action...
  • The Constitution IS the Crisis
      A Review of Murray N. Rothbard’s Conceived in Liberty, Vol. 5 Holy Writ The posthumous release of Murray Rothbard’s fifth volume of his early American history series, Conceived in Liberty, is a cause of celebration not only for those interested in the country’s constitutional period, but also for the present day as the nation is faced with acute social, economic, and political crises.   Murray Rothbard, the foremost representative of the “American branch” of the...
  • A Pharmaceutical Stock That Is Often Particularly Strong At This Time Of The Year
      An Example of Strong Single Stock Seasonality Many individual stocks exhibits phases of seasonal strength. Being invested in these phases is therefore an especially promising strategy.   Danish drug company Novo Nordisk   Today I want to introduce you to a stock that tends to advance particularly strongly at this time of the year: Novo Nordisk. The Danish pharmaceutical group supplies a broad range of products and is a global market leader in diabetes...
  • The Secret to Fun and Easy Stock Market Riches
      Post Hoc Fallacy On Tuesday, at the precise moment Federal Reserve Chairman Jay Powell commenced delivering his semiannual monetary policy report to the House Financial Services Committee, something unpleasant happened. The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) didn't go up. Rather, it went down.   The Fed chair and His Magnificence, God Emperor, Field Marshall & Stable Genius, POTUS Donald J. Trump: a complicated relationship. [PT]   Were the DJIA...

Support Acting Man

Austrian Theory and Investment

j9TJzzN

The Review Insider

Archive

Dog Blow

THE GOLD CARTEL: Government Intervention on Gold, the Mega Bubble in Paper and What This Means for Your Future

Realtime Charts

 

Gold in USD:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

Gold in EUR:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

Silver in USD:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

Platinum in USD:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

USD - Index:

[Most Recent USD from www.kitco.com]

 

Mish Talk

     
    Buy Silver Now!
     
    Buy Gold Now!