Economic and Political Quagmires

We want to briefly take another look at the situation in four of the emerging market countries that have recently been the focus of considerable market upheaval. The countries concerned are Turkey, Venezuela, Argentina and South Africa. There are considerable differences between these countries. The only thing that unites them is a worrisome trend in their trade and/or current account balances and the recent massive swoon in their currencies as foreign investors have exited their markets (this in turn has pressured the prices of securities). There is currently an economic and political crisis in three of the four countries, with  South Africa the sole exception.

However, even South Africa is feeling the heat from the fact that it has a large current account deficit and the ongoing exodus of foreign investors from emerging markets. However, the country is actually used to experiencing vast fluctuations in foreign investment flows in short time periods and has the potential to relatively quickly turn its balance of payments position around. Of the four countries in question, it seems to us to be the most flexible one in this respect.

 

Argentina and Venezuela

Argentina and Venezuela are special cases in that their trade resp. current account positions are actually comparatively stronger, but the economic policies pursued by their governments are so utterly harebrained and repressive that everybody tries to get their money out as quickly as possible. The immediate problem is that both countries are being drained of foreign exchange reserves at an accelerating clip, inter alia a result of trying to keep their exchange rates artificially high. This is actually quite astonishing considering their considerable latent export prowess.

Both countries have governments that steadfastly deny the existence of economic laws and apparently genuinely believe that their absurd repressive decrees can 'fix' their economies. The markets regard Argentina as the slightly greater credit risk, as it is still fighting the so-called 'hold-outs' from its 2001 default. However, Venezuela is lately catching up, in spite of its vast oil wealth. The two countries currently have the dubious distinction of being the nations with the highest probability of sovereign debt default in the world – not even the crisis-ridden Ukraine comes remotely close (see chart of CDS spreads further below for details).

We have recently discussed the deteriorating situation in Venezuela in some detail and a more in-depth update on Argentina is in the works. Let us just note here that Argentina (the government of which is incidentally the fiercest supporter of Venezuela's president Maduro at the moment) seems to be where Venezuela was about a year or so ago. Both countries are on the same path of inflationism and growing economic and financial repression.

 


 

argentina-balance-of-trade

Argentina's balance of trade remains positive – click to enlarge.

 


 

argentina-current-accountHowever, the current account balance has begun to deteriorate. The country's foreign exchange reserves have collapsed due to a doomed attempt to defend the exchange rate – click to enlarge.

 


 

venezuela-balance-of-tradeVenezuela is a big oil exporter, but needs to import 70% of the consumer goods sold in the country. Its balance of trade is therefore deeply negative, especially as the state-run ('very, very red') PDVSA is being run into the ground and produces less and less oil – click to enlarge.

 


 

venezuela-current-accountIn spite of reporting a positive current account balance, Venezuela is losing foreign exchange reserves fast, due to trying to maintain an artificially high exchange rate even in the face of soaring inflation – click to enlarge.

 


 

In Venezuela's and Argentina's case, the markets are rightly worried that the situation will probably deteriorate further. The intransigence of their governments with regard to pursuing economic policies that demonstrably don't work and the resultant growing political risks conspire to create a highly unstable backdrop. As in all such cases, one must expect knock-on effects to emerge elsewhere.

 

Turkey

Turkey has been hailed as a shining example of how an emerging economy should grow, but as is so often the case, it has in the meantime become evident that what it has mainly done was to engage in a massive credit-financed boom, displaying all the associated bubble activities, malinvestment of capital and overconsumption. This unsustainable boom was exacerbated by the fact that the Erdogan government pressured the central bank to keep rates extremely low. Even while prices were obviously misbehaving, with the rate of change of CPI oscillating between about 6.2% and nearly 11% and the stock market rising in parabolic fashion, the central bank kept its repo rate in the low single digits (this has only very recently changed).

With his country in the middle of a serious economic crisis, Erdogan has come under fire politically because his government has turned out to be a den of corruption to boot. So what does he do? He is taking a leaf from what the Western nations have demonstrated to be de rigeur these days, since don't you know, we're all surrounded by evil terrorists hiding in caves in the Hindu Kush somewhere. In short, he is moving toward increasingly authoritarian rule. Just take a look at this recent press report:

 

“Battling a corruption scandal, Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan is seeking broader powers for his intelligence agency, including more scope for eavesdropping and legal immunity for its top agent, according to a draft law seen by Reuters.

The proposals submitted by Erdogan's AK Party late on Wednesday are the latest in what his opponents see as an authoritarian backlash against the graft inquiry, after parliament passed laws tightening government control over the Internet and the courts this month.

The bill gives the National Intelligence Organisation (MIT) the authority to conduct operations abroad and tap pay phones and international calls. It also introduces jail terms of up to 12 years for the publication of leaked classified documents. It stipulates that only a top appeals court could try the head of the agency with the prime minister's permission, and would require private companies as well as state institutions to hand over consumer data and technical equipment when requested.

"This bill will bring the MIT in line with the necessities of the era, grant it the capabilities of other intelligence agencies, and increase its methods and capacity for individual and technical intelligence," the draft document said.

 

(emphasis added)

The 'necessities of the era' – we couldn't have put it in a more Orwellian fashion. And guess what? The vaunted 'defenders of freedom' in the West probably aren't going to object for even a millisecond.

Turkey's economy is a shambles right now, and Erdogan wants to cling to power by any means possible – that is what the 'necessities of the era' are really all about. For a long time it was held that the world as a whole was moving toward more, rather than less freedom. We regret to inform you that this trend has reversed more than a decade ago, on the day the WTC towers crumbled.

Meanwhile, what is now also crumbling is Turkey's economy. However, we would argue that Turkey's economic situation isn't 'unfixable' if the proper policies are implemented quickly. After all, there has been a very successful period of economic liberalization under Erdogan's government as well, which has left the economy more flexible and thus better able to deal with adverse developments. A wrenching adjustment is nevertheless unavoidable at this point.

 


 

turkey-current-accountTurkey has a large current account deficit. The fact that foreign investment inflows have now dried up is putting enormous strain on the economy. Consumer confidence has plunged, as has the currency – click to enlarge.

 


 

turkey-inflation-cpiDuring a time when inflation remained stubbornly high, the central bank left its repo rate at 4% – click to enlarge.

 


 

As one analyst sagely remarked:

 

“From 2009 to 2013, Turkey was considered by many to be a rising star among the emerging markets, but currently it may be the triggering force for worsening the emerging-market outlook globally in 2014."

 

South Africa

South Africa's case is in many ways comparable to Turkey's – the country also sports a large current account and trade deficit for example. However, while South Africa's CPI 'inflation' rate has always been high by developed country standards, it has on average been much lower and less volatile than Turkey's, fluctuating between 5% and 6.4% in recent years. Contrary to Turkey's central bank, South Africa's central bank is fiercely independent and focused solely on keeping CPI in check. In fact, it may well be one of the world's most conservative central banks. It also refuses to intervene in the currency market and allows the Rand to go to wherever market forces push it. This non-intervention policy was actually quite difficult to defend while the Rand was among the world's strongest currencies during the emerging markets boom of the 2000d's. A plethora of special interests in South Africa were pleading with the central bank to do something to weaken the Rand, but it remained steadfast.

While the current account deficit means that more currency weakness is probably in store, South Africa does have a vibrant export sector. During the apartheid years, it had a perennial trade surplus, partly a result of being forced to conserve foreign exchange reserves in the face of economic sanctions. Similar to Turkey, South Africa imports all the oil it uses, which is a key vulnerability of both countries. However, the weakening of the Rand already has an effect: the trade balance has recently turned positive for the first time since 2010.

 


 

south-africa-current-account

South Africa's current account is still deeply in the red – click to enlarge.

 


 

south-africa-balance-of-trade

However, a trade surplus has begun to emerge on the back of the weaker Rand – click to enlarge.

 

 


 

Investors in emerging markets like to use the Rand as a hedge for EM currency exposure, due to its relatively good liquidity and the fact that the central bank isn't going to intervene directly. At times this fact probably exacerbates the moves in the Rand.

The political situation in South Africa is almost always somewhat dubious, and the  Zuma presidency is no exception to that rule. There is a lot of corruption and quite a few economic policy decisions appear to us to be misguided. One must keep in mind in this context that the ANC government is continually under pressure to deliver an improvement in living standards to the formerly oppressed parts of the population, which often leads to the adoption of populist positions that are not economically sensible.

However, there exist also many misconceptions about SA and the ANC's political legacy in the West. In spite of being formally allied with the communists (SACP) and the trade union umbrella body COSATU, the ANC has for instance privatized many of the companies that used to be state-owned under the national-socialist regime of the National Party (NP) that ruled the country during the apartheid years (a funny aside to this: the NP has dissolved itself and has been amalgamated with the ANC a few years ago). One slightly worrisome development is that the government deficit has grown sharply since 2010. While the government previously ran an almost balanced budget, the annual deficit amounted to more than 5% of GDP over the past four years. Nevertheless, due to the tight fiscal policy implemented previously, the public debt-GDP ratio is still below 40% – a number most developed countries can only dream of.

 

Sovereign Credit Risk

 


 

CDS Turkey, Argentina, Venezuela, SA5 year CDS spreads on the sovereign debt of Argentina, Venezuela, South Africa and Turkey. Keep in mind that the scaling is different for each of the data series – click to enlarge.

 


 

As can be seen above, the markets consider Turkey the second-smallest sovereign credit  risk among the four nations at the moment.  Its debt-to-GDP ratio is very similar to South Africa's, at just 36%. The budget deficit has fluctuated between 2.8% and 5.5% of GDP over the past four years. Both data points are however what we would term 'remnants of the bubble', as the government's tax revenues soared along with the economic boom. With the boom faltering, a sharp deterioration in these data points should be expected.

South Africa is actually in a slightly better position in this regard, as it has not experienced comparable boom conditions. Consequently the fact that the CDS spread on its sovereign debt is actually slightly below that of Turkey makes sense.

Argentina is currently considered the worst sovereign credit risk in the world – not least due to the fact that its foreign exchange reserves have declined dramatically and the trend is ongoing. 

 


 

argentina forex reservesArgentina's reserves are falling sharply – click to enlarge.

 


 

This throws more and more doubt on the country's ability to service its foreign debt, which in the light of the 2001 default and its aftermath has made the markets wary. 5 year CDS spreads at 2,206 basis points reflect a great deal of risk (this represents an annual default probability of roughly 17% at an assumed 40% recovery rate).

Venezuela is lately catching up – its 5 year sovereign CDS spreads have soared to  almost 1,700 basis points from less than 1,200 at the end of last year. This is testament to the fact that the economy has begun to implode under the Maduro government. While Maduro himself is just as bad as Chavez was in terms of economic policy, it should be pointed out that Chavez' policies are what laid the foundations for current events. It has taken a while for this South America-style goulash-socialism to fail, as it allowed a remnant of the market economy to operate most of the time. However, the impositions on the private sector have simply become too onerous and galloping inflation has delivered the coup de grace, as economic calculation has become extremely distorted, if not nigh impossible.

 

Conclusion:

The crisis in emerging market economies vulnerable to capital flight is unlikely to be over. Note that we have picked merely four cases, but there are several other developing countries that are currently in various states of political and economic crisis as well (e.g. India, Thailand, Brazil, to name a few). We have looked the two worst cases here, one of medium severity (Turkey) and one of the better cases (South Africa) in order to present as broad an overview as possible. The fate of Argentina and Venezuela is up in the air – it will require massive political change to alter their prospects.

However, other emerging market economies are bound to eventually bounce back and exhibit strong economic growth again. The imbalances can all be overcome, but the adjustments required are liable to play out in the form of economic and financial market crises of varying severity.

One must not forget in this context that Japan continues to pursue a mercantilist currency policy, which redounds on its competitors in Asia, which in turn affects their main suppliers. We continue to believe that Japan's decision to weaken the yen has been a major contributor to recent currency turmoil elsewhere (of course, this does not mean that many of the countries concerned have not been wanting in terms of their own policies).

Moreover, China is hanging over the proceedings like the proverbial Sword of Damocles. HSBC has just reported its latest flash estimate on China's manufacturing PMI (pdf), which was quite weak at 48.3, a seven month low  indicating a worsening contraction. In view of the enormous credit bubble which China has embarked on since 2008 (about $15 trillion in additional debt have been created since then), the danger of a larger setback being set in motion by a sharp slowdown or even recession in China cannot be dismissed.

 

 

 

Charts by: Tradingeconomics, Reuters, Bloomberg


 

 

 

Emigrate While You Can... Learn More

 


 

 
 

Dear Readers!

You may have noticed that our so-called “semiannual” funding drive, which started sometime in the summer if memory serves, has seamlessly segued into the winter. In fact, the year is almost over! We assure you this is not merely evidence of our chutzpa; rather, it is indicative of the fact that ad income still needs to be supplemented in order to support upkeep of the site. Naturally, the traditional benefits that can be spontaneously triggered by donations to this site remain operative regardless of the season - ranging from a boost to general well-being/happiness (inter alia featuring improved sleep & appetite), children including you in their songs, up to the likely allotment of privileges in the afterlife, etc., etc., but the Christmas season is probably an especially propitious time to cross our palms with silver. A special thank you to all readers who have already chipped in, your generosity is greatly appreciated. Regardless of that, we are honored by everybody's readership and hope we have managed to add a little value to your life.

   

Bitcoin address: 12vB2LeWQNjWh59tyfWw23ySqJ9kTfJifA

   
 

3 Responses to “Emerging Markets Crisis – It’s Not Over Yet”

  • Hans:

    Another great read! Thank you, Mr Tenebrarum.

  • Last week, Doug Noland included a clip out of an article, where China’s banking system had expanded by $14 plus trillion over the past 5 years, an amount roughly the size of the entire US banking system. This is a credit bubble of historic proportions, spurring mal-investment of historic proportions and likely leading to a bust of epic proportions. If this doesn’t happen, the economic theories of Mises will have been about proven false. I highly doubt that will occur.

    Garet Garrett wrote a book that can be found on the mises.org site, titled “A Bubble That Broke the World”. He describes a boom financed by the booming United States and a consuming Europe. The roles have been shifted to a consuming United States and a booming China and the bubbles are twins. One could throw Germany into the mix along with Japan, which is attempting to recover its recent past glory as the big time growth economy it formerly occupied.

    There are differences. I suspect you could put Japan in the place of Britain in the 1920’s. Germany is like it was in the 20’s save for the fact it is more akin to what the USA was then. But, it is a growing US that is required to continue to supply the demand and solvency to continue the bubble game. This puts the USA in the shoes of the 1920’s Germany, in that once its debt becomes in doubt, the house of cards collapses. That could be done by the international markets, or it could merely be through the exhaustion of consumer demand through a lack of continued good consumer credit. As more and more of the chips are being swept into fewer and larger piles, the likelihood that the credit game continues becomes slimmer and slimmer. There is no greater explanation of the poor recovery in the US than the fact the primary driver of consumer credit, the equity in homes, has dried up. The primary attempt at recovery has been to restore this excessive debt capacity to housing through manipulation in interest rates, thus lowering payments and increasing the amount that can be paid for a home. The results have been mixed so far, but housing is bubbling in a lot of markets again. Despite these bubbles, the supply hasn’t materialized this time around.

    I doubt any of the 4 markets mentioned would cause the world economy much trouble, save for Venezuela, where a revolution could create a spike in oil prices. Political turmoil in Turkey could be a trigger for war, should the government fall into the hands of extremists. That would be slower in developing. Argentina was broke when it started. The primary effect would be a drying up of credit for a lot more of these type economies, which could or would trigger a worldwide recession.

    China is another matter. Whereas the mess of the 1930’s in the USA was likely attributed to the Ponzi financing of trade and war, I suspect much of the US economy was built on otherwise solid ground. Of course, you can’t support fake demand through Ponzi financing for ever, nor can you manipulate prices to put floors under them, as the Hoover Commerce department attempted in the 1920’s. That is beside the point, as China has had a command economy mixed with export demand for cheap labor. The result has been a lot of pie in the sky investment, along with a financial system that hasn’t recognized faulty investment and liquidated its mistakes. Whereas the world is convinced the economy in China is exports, the real economy in China is building more capacity in anything imagined, from steel to housing to office space to bullet trains to international airports everywhere. Its influence on other emerging markets has been huge, along with mineral exporters such as Australia, Chile and Brazil. This game of Ponzi finance can only go on so long.

    In a lot of ways, China looks like Japan, save for the fact the dance hasn’t stopped there. One only need look at their stock market, which collapsed in 2008, rebounded quickly in 2009, then fell and has laid there like a dead bird since. There is something wrong in a fast growing economy that has pumped in $14 trillion in credit over the past 5 years and there isn’t a pulse in the stock market. Likely the indication is all that expansion has netted a big fat ZERO. What has been built can theoretically be used, but it would likely mean that something else has to be liquidated. We live in interesting times.

    • Crysangle:

      That is a good analysis PT , and a good look from you mannfm .

      From my point of view mannfm , the US credit bubble and its spending in China is politically enabled by combined US/Chinese policy – in effect we had the Chinese state running the return investment of dollars back into the US system (housing finance and govt. debt principally) , with the placet of the US authorities . The point I am making is that there is now a break in that loop . You could say it was ‘good’ consumer credit limited , you could also say that the dollar peg has not allowed real economic adjustment or that it has enabled state capitalism in both countries , you could also say that both countries have little of great worth worth further exchanging under current circumstance , and so on.

      When you say the four countries mentioned are unlikely to have a large effect (or in comparison with China maybe ?) , I will chip in a little info that might make you think . 25% of Spain’s business earnings come from South America , primarily Brazil and Mexico (both of which, particularly Brazil, are heavily invested in Argentina) … Brazil also supports Venezuela as part of the Mercosur framework (including politically , at least notionally) and its position is being revised downwards . The devaluations of currencies and other events in LatAm are already causing difficulties … and remember Spanish banks have their own domestic problems of ‘solvency’ , as does the government , and EU .

      ZH has a look at some EU bank exposure to EM – Turkey has some very large recent banking mergers with Spanish institutions also

      http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-02-04/3-trillion-hole-why-em-matters-european-banks

      I am not trying to make one point or another really except that there is a lot more at stake in emerging markets outside of China than might appear.

Your comment:

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Most read in the last 20 days:

  • How Beijing Uses Fake Money to Cannibalize the U.S. Transit Market
      A Distorted Landscape One of the more remarkable achievements of fake money creation is that it distorts and disfigures the world in odd and uncanny ways.  Dow (not quite) 27,000.  Million dollar shacks.  Over $13 trillion in subzero-yielding debt. You name it.  Any and every disfiguration is possible with enough fake money.   The global stock of outstanding government bonds with negative yields-to-maturity reaches a new record high of more than $13 trillion – this is...
  • Gold, the Safe Haven - Precious Metals Supply and Demand
      Investments vs. Money Last week the price of gold went up another $11, but the price of silver dropped 4 cents. The gold-silver ratio hit another new high, up another point, though down from Tuesday’s high water mark. This obviously was not the week that wage-earners increased their money holdings or that institutions expressed a preference for the bargain of silver.   Prosperity is just around the corner... and so is the trade deal. [PT]   This coming week...
  • Independence Day in America Circa 2019
      Freedom and Apple Pie The days are long and hot in the Northern Hemisphere when real American patriots raise the stars and stripes. Today the free and brave, with duty and self-sacrifice, begrudgingly accept federal holiday pay to stand tall upon their own two feet. Rugged individualism and uncompromising independence are essential to their character.   Independence day festivities...   With purpose and intent, they assemble as merry mobs along the shoreline to...
  • The Strange Behavior of the US Dollar in the Wake of Fed Rate Cuts
      A Change in Interest Rate Expectations In the last issue of Seasonal Insights I discussed the typical pattern of stock prices when the Federal Reserve cuts interest rates.  As one would expect, the stock market tends to stabilize after cuts in the federal funds rate. The issue is topical, as many investors and analysts expect rate cuts to be implemented soon given that signs of an economic slowdown are beginning to proliferate.   Market expectations about the direction of...
  • The Four Dimensions of the Fake Money Order
      A Good Story with Minor Imperfections “If you don’t know where you are going, any road will get you there,” is a quote that’s oft misattributed to Lewis Carrol. The fact that there is ambiguity about who is behind this quote on ambiguity seems fitting. For our purposes today, the spirit of the quote is what we are after. We think it may help elucidate the strange and confusing world of fake money in which we all travel.   Consumer price index, y/y rate of change...
  • Wall of Worry M.I.A. -  Precious Metals Supply and Demand
      Too Much Excitement? The prices of the metals fell last week, with that of gold -$9 and silver -$0.32. Of course, it was a week of stock market exuberance. Why would anyone want to own money, or seek safety when the Fed can seemingly push interest down / assets up indefinitely? As the old TV ad for Lotto proclaimed “you gotta be in it, to win it!”   “Stablecoin” Tether is used as a dollar stand-in on cryptocurrency exchanges that offer no fiat currency pairs. There has...
  • Resistance Created by Long-Suffering “Hodlers” - Precious Metals Supply and Demand
      Gold vs Other Assets The prices of the metals went up +$15 and +$0.23. We will be brief this week, as Keith just got off a 17-hour flight from Perth to London. Stocks continue their march upwards. And hence the gold price seems stalled—or is it? It may seem like gold goes up, when stocks go down and vice versa. That’s been the recent pattern. Why should people own money without return, when stocks are where the action is?   Gold-SPX ratio: in long-term gold bull markets,...

Support Acting Man

Austrian Theory and Investment

j9TJzzN

The Review Insider

Archive

Dog Blow

THE GOLD CARTEL: Government Intervention on Gold, the Mega Bubble in Paper and What This Means for Your Future

Realtime Charts

 

Gold in USD:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

Gold in EUR:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

Silver in USD:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

Platinum in USD:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

USD - Index:

[Most Recent USD from www.kitco.com]

 

Mish Talk

 
Buy Silver Now!
 
Buy Gold Now!